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Instructor Assistance

For students with learning disabilities

  • Allow students to tape record lectures and directions for assignments.
  • Have students use a note-taker to back up their own notes.
  • Supply the students with outlines of your lecture and/or copies of overheads.
  • Avoid putting too much information on a single page of handouts or overheads. This may be confusing for students.
  • Allow students to show what they have learned using different approaches.
  • Encourage students to rewrite their lecture notes.
  • Provide students with sample test questions and acceptable answers.
  • Allow students to have extended time for testing in a quiet place.
  • Encourage the use of word processing equipment that will help LD students compose, edit, and spell more accurately.
  • Give all assignments and course expectations in written and verbal form.
  • Use demonstrations and "hands-on" experiences as appropriate.
  • Allow additional time for overheads or board work to be copied.

For students with attentional disorders (ADD/ADHD)

  • Allow a break during long lectures.
  • Provide students with a lecture outline and try to follow it closely.
  • Keep distractions to a minimum.
  • Provide different ways for students to show what they have learned.
  • Write important dates on the board and have a set time for students to copy it.
  • Be open to students tape recording lectures.
  • Encourage students to use extended time for testing if it is one of their services.
  • Facilitate students using note-takers if they are eligible.
  • Supply students with copies of your own notes and overheads.
  • Allow additional time for overheads or board work to be copied.

For students with vision impairments

  • Prepare book lists as soon as possible. It takes six to eight weeks to get taped textbooks. Higher-level technology, math, or science textbooks could take up to three or four months to tape.
  • Allow students to tape record lectures.
  • Provide appropriate verbal descriptions to accompany visual aids, diagrams, films, or videos used in class.
  • Verbalize information written on the board or on overheads.
  • Allow guide dogs in the classroom; they are trained to behave and will not disturb your class.
  • Encourage students with visual impairments to sit in the front of the class.
  • Suggest that students utilize a note-taker.
  • Use clear handouts. Old, used handouts are difficult to read even when enlarged.
  • Allow extended time for testing in an alternate setting. Tests will need to be read to students or enlarged.
  • Give assignments in both verbal and written forms.
  • Supply students with copies of your own notes and overheads which can be enlarged for them.

For students with hearing impairments

  • Give students preferential seating.
  • Repeat comments and questions asked by other students who are not in the range of vision for students with hearing disabilities.
  • Use closed-captioned videos whenever possible.
  • Establish a system of contacting students in case of class cancellations or changes.
  • Direct your conversation to hearing-impaired students, not to their interpreters.
  • Use visual media (overheads, handouts) as much as possible.
  • Provide a list of technical terminology or specialized vocabulary to students and to their interpreters.
  • Allow a few seconds between pointing to a visual aid and speaking. This gives hearing-impaired students time to look at the aid and then at the interpreter.
  • Glance at the interpreter occasionally. If you notice strain or lack of hand movement, you may be speaking too fast and the interpreter is lost.
  • Convey important class information, assignments, and deadlines in both verbal and written forms.
  • Allow extended time for testing.
  • Supply students with copies of your own notes and overheads.
  • Allow additional time for overheads or board work to be copied.

For students with mobility impairments

  • Encourage the use of a tape recorder and note-taker in class.
  • Arrange for appropriate time for completion of class assignments.
  • Allow for extended time for testing in a quiet place.
  • Allow the use of a lab partner for laboratory experiences.
  • Sit at students' eye level, whenever possible, if they are in a wheelchair, when conversing.
  • Wait for students to ask for assistance; don't assume assistance is necessary.
  • Allow additional time for overheads or board work to be copied.

For students with psychiatric disorders

  • Allow extended time for tests in a quiet, distraction-free environment.
  • Encourage use of tape recorders and/or note-takers.
  • Encourage students to seek tutoring in course materials.
  • Request the assistance of the the Moraine Valley Police Department if student's behavior is inappropriate.
  • Supply students with copies of your own notes and overheads.

Not all of the above strategies are applicable to each student with the particular listed disability. Instructors should work with students on an individual basis.

 
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